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Accessing Windows/Samba Shares from OS/2

posted Mar 13, 2011, 6:14 PM by hyunghwan chung   [ updated Dec 1, 2011, 5:12 PM ]
This page shows how to configure OS/2 Netbios over TCP/IP on OS/2 Warp 4.5x to access Windows/Samba shares.

Run MPTS Network Adapters and Protocol Services by choosing it from under OS/2 System - System Setup or typing mpts from the command window.


Click OK.


Click Configure.


Keep LAN adapters and protocols selected and click Configure.


Choose IBM OS/2 NETBIOS OVER TCP/IP in Protocols and click Add.


Then it is added to Current Configuration.


Remove IBM OS/2 NETBIOS from Current Configuration assuming that you access Netbios over TCP/IP only.


Choose IBM OS/2 NETBIOS OVER TCP/IP from Current Configuration and Click Edit. Choose Names list and click Configure.


Add computer names to access with an IP address or a host name. Netbios commands like net use on OS/2 cannot access a computer with a host name or an IP address directly. You should assign a separate computer name to a host name or an IP address and use the computer name to access a share on the computer. In the sample above, I've added a computer name tpedge with an IP address of 192.168.2.1. The computer names added here are stored into C:\IBMCOM\RFCNAMES.LST.


Note that the maximum number of entries into the Names list is determined by the Maximum number of name-ip address pairs in names file parameter. You may have to adjust the value for this parameter depending on the number of computers to access. To edit the value, choose Driver parameters and click OK in the NETBIOS over TCP/IP dialog box.


You can exit to the following dialog box by clicking Close and OK a few times.


Once you reach here, you can click Exit.

But this MPTS configuration program misses a critical change that must be made to C:\IBMLAN\IBMLAN.INI. The glitch is that it doesn't change NETBEUI$ to TCPBEUI$ though IBM OS/2 NETBIOS was removed IBM OS/2 NETBIOS OVER TCP/IP was added.


You need to make a manual change from NETBEUI$ to TCPBEUI$ before you reboot the system. Note that the number 0 after TCPBEUI$ must match the number shown in Current Configuration of the Adapter and Protocol Configuration dialog.


You can Save the change and reboot the system.


If a share on the computer is password protected, you may log on to the network with the logon command. Assuming that there is no domain controller or LAN server, you can execute it without verification.

[C:\] logon /v:none

It will present a dialog where you can type a user ID and a password since none of them were provided on the command-line.


You can mount a share with the net command. The following example maps a share named public from the computer tpedge to the drive X:.

[C:\] net use x: \\tpedge\public

You may unmap the drive by executing this.

[C:\] net use x: /delete

You may view shared resources by executing something like this.

[C:\] net view \\tpedge

You may log off from the network by executing this.

[C:\] logoff /l


Notes on the server side configuration
The tcpbeui protocol on OS/2 Warp 4.5 seems to be able to talk legacy LAN manager protocol only. It's important that the server should support this legacy protocol.

If you're using Samba, you can check if it is enabled by executing this.

$ testparm -v < /dev/null | grep lanman

Another thing you should not forget to check is the lanman hash field of a user account. If the password of a user account is set before lanman authentication is enabled, it's likely that the account contains X's in the lanman hash field as shown below for the user tiger, meaning that the account is disabled for legacy lanman authentication.

$ pdbedit -Lw tiger
tiger:8001:XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX:D7F50F219262C3AB983A7907386CC34D:[U          ]:LCT-4ECF9213:

You can enable such an account for lanman authentication by setting the password again with smbpasswd.
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 8:04 AM
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 8:04 AM
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 8:27 AM
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
ą
hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
ą
hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
ą
hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
ą
hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
ą
hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
ą
hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:38 AM
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 7:39 AM
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hyunghwan chung,
Nov 25, 2011, 8:15 AM
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